Weeping Rock Trail, Zion National Park Hiking

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Weeping Rock Trail

A popular hiking trail in Zion National Park, the Weeping Rock Trail is a short and easy hike for the whole family to some great views of Zion Canyon.

  • The Weeping Rock Trail takes you through the desert area of Zion National Park
  • A short half-mile hike which takes about 30 minutes
  • An easy out-and-back trail with interpretive signs along the way
  • Trailhead is at the Weeping Rock parking lot
  • Marvel at the views of Zion Canyon

Overview

This clearly marked nature trail in Zion National Park offers informative signs that explain more about the features and plant life of this area. The Weeping Rock Trail also gives you the opportunity to see desert springs, cliffs where water seeps quietly, and hanging gardens of great beauty. Visitors are enthralled with the views of Zion Canyon, and particularly of the Great White Throne – a famous landmark in the park.

Although a moderately steep climb, this short trail is easy to navigate and can be cool even at the hottest times of day. A great trail for the whole family.

Trailhead

From April through October or early November, you can take the park shuttle to the Weeping Rock stop, getting off and walk up to the footbridge to begin your walk along Weeping Rock Trail. The remainder of the year you can simply drive into Zion Canyon on the loop road and park in the Weeping Rock parking lot.

Details

  • Distance – 0.5 miles
  • Average Time of Hike – 30 minutes
  • Elevation Gain – 280 feet
  • Difficulty – Easy
  • Trail Type – Out and back

Plan & Prepare

You can access the trail at any time of year, but in winter the trail is sometimes closed due to ice. The best season to come is from March to October. Coming in spring often gives the opportunity to see impressive waterfalls from the runoff.

Due to the seeping water from the Weeping Rock alcove, expect to get somewhat wet. It can also get slippery, so watch your step.

This is a desert environment, so be sure to bring a hat and plenty of drinking water.

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